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Post Mon Jul 07, 2008 10:31 pm
Kaluden User avatar
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Posts: 184
Location: Shakopee, MN
Ok, I figure this is the place to go to find out the information on this.

I went fishing at my bosses cabin the other weekend and caught some amazing looking sunnies, perch, crappies, large mouth bass, northerns... I think thats all I caught. While they tasted awesome, I couldn't help but look at some of the sunnies coloring and say "good lord that would look amazing in my tank." Of course, I would have to try and manage to keep them alive during the 3.5hour commute home, and then deal with trying to help them heal from hook injuries, but some of the smaller sunnies I saw but didn't bother trying to catch (too big a lure) would be worth the hassle.

So my question is this! What are the DNR rules and regulations concerning keeping sunnies and possibly perch? Does anyone have info as to what sort of tank conditions wild sunnies would need? I figure I would have to test my bosses lake water in order to try and replicate the PH and such, but other than that, what else?

I have this mental image of a sweet natural sandy bottom low light tank with large amounts of big low light plants in it, with a small school of sunnies swimming through there, and possibly a pleco just for cleanliness sake... Is this a possibility? Or is this just yet another pipe-dream?

Please help a brotha out!

Post Tue Jul 08, 2008 8:48 pm
Kaluden User avatar
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Level 4 Member

Posts: 184
Location: Shakopee, MN
Nobody? I thought there was a native fish guy that posted on here...

Post Tue Jul 08, 2008 9:58 pm
dnrdarryl Level 5 Member
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Posts: 428
Location: Ames, IA
I'll take a shot at the DNR rules. I'm from Iowa and rules are slightly different between states so check the MN DNR Fishing regs web site.

In general you need a fishing license; you can't take more than your legal daily limit for a species; and some states are now requiring you to 'kill' the fish 'immediately' (trying to reduce 'sorting' losses). You must use a hook and line; no nets unless you have a 'bait dealers' license.
Greg Hanson

It's not a cup, it's a fish tank with a handle. :-)

Post Wed Jul 09, 2008 12:07 am
JollyT Level 7 Member
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Posts: 792
Location: Coon Rapids, MN
From the 2008 MN fishing Regulations.

Transporting Fish
• Except while on the body of water where taken, live fish may not be
transported in a quantity of water sufficient to keep them alive unless the
fish are bait minnows or the person is authorized to do so by the DNR.
• Transport of fish for display in a home aquarium is legal under the
following conditions:
– Game fish purchased from an authorized licensee transported with
the necessary documents (such as a sales receipt).
– Anglers 16 or under may transport legally caught largemouth bass,
smallmouth bass, yellow perch, rock bass, black crappie, white
crappie, bluegill, pumpkinseed, green sunfish, orange spotted
sunfish, and black, yellow, and brown bullhead. No more than
four of each species may be transported at any one time, and any
individual fish can be no longer than 10 inches. At no time may
water from infested waters be transported.
The aquarium hobby is a bottomless money pit, where con men and charlatans run wild, leaving good men to live on as shattered, hollow, husks of themselves. There is also a dark side...

Post Sat Jul 12, 2008 10:52 am
cheesehead User avatar
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Posts: 163
Location: River Falls, WI
Then there's keeping them, which may be more difficult than getting the permit.

Think the biggest, messiest oscar you've had that needs to be fed constantly... but it likes cold really clean water. You may need a chiller and massive continual water changes. But it probably be a lot less water than I run through my RO unit for SA cichlids :roll:

Had a friend who brought a couple of juvi bass home once & kept them in his tank. He couldn't keep them properly fed and they didn't thrive - they really looked awful.

BUT - do a google search on sunfish + aquarium. (or "lepomis", the genus name) There are some species of sunfish that are smaller and from more southern climes (used to warmer water). Your best resource might be the North American Native Fish Association, NANFA (www.nanfa.org).

good luck!

Post Tue Jul 15, 2008 5:07 pm
Butch Level 4 Member
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Posts: 118
Location: crow wing
There's different species of Sunfish can be kept in aquarium. Smaller species are easy to take care and very pretty:
They can keep into 30gals tank:
Bluespotted sunfish
Banded sunfish
Blackbanded
Orangespotted
Bantam
Dollars

Mid sized sunfish do fine in 55gallons tank:
Longear
Redbreast
Blackspotted
Redspotted
Flier
Mud

Large sized sunfish needs 75gal or bigger tank:
Bluegill
Pumpkinseed
Green
Warmouth
Redear
Hybrid (Hatchery)
White crappie
Black crappie
Rock bass
Yellow Perch (likes in schools)

You should never try to keep largemouth/smallmouth bass in home aquarium, they will outgrow even 200gal tank and they are much aggressive.

Now for bullheads, a single adult bullhead only need 125 gallon tank without any tankmates.

Post Tue Jul 15, 2008 9:39 pm
Kaluden User avatar
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Posts: 184
Location: Shakopee, MN
Thanks guys, thats all good to know. I was kind of thinking of maybe going for pumpkin seeds. I will still look into all of this, thanks for the info everyone.

Post Wed Jul 16, 2008 2:59 am
treehugger Level 4 Member
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Posts: 173
Location: minneapolis
Go for the pumpkinseeds.

When they get too big you can always eat them.

Same goes for the bullheads which are great aquarium fish until they get too big and eat their tankmates.

Darters are the best native fish I have kept so far. They are tiny walleyes that "walk" with their pectoral fins. They line up along the edge of the tank to beg for food. They quickly figured out the frozen blood worms and brine shrimp (the feeding frenzy of the dace probably clued them in).

I did my first "darter hunt" this spring. It was a lot of fun and worth the price of membership in the aquarium society for that alone. We now have three kinds of darters in the middle school aquariums as well as quite a number of non-darter water creatures.

There are no aquarium police who check aquariums for native fish. Getting stopped by the game warden on your way home would be your main fear. But they do technically count toward your limit. I heard there is a huge fine for releasing sunfish into the wild, even into the same water they came from.

Do purchased game fish with receipts count against your fishing limits? Didn't I hear that 288 was the limit for "minnows?"

--Henry

Post Fri Aug 08, 2008 7:45 am
goldtopper User avatar
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Posts: 21
Location: St. Paul
Keeping game fish in Mn is illegal unless purchased from a dealer. Call the DNR for clarification.
God Bless Our Troops, Especially The Snipers

Post Fri Aug 08, 2008 11:09 am
Butch Level 4 Member
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Posts: 118
Location: crow wing
Goldtopper don't assume that gamefish are illegal to keep.
You could keep these gamefish if your 16 and have angling license then I don't see any illegal.

Post Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:04 pm
goldtopper User avatar
Level 1 Member
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Posts: 21
Location: St. Paul
Butch wrote:
Goldtopper don't assume that gamefish are illegal to keep.
You could keep these gamefish if your 16 and have angling license then I don't see any illegal.


I was speaking as an adult.
God Bless Our Troops, Especially The Snipers

Post Fri Aug 08, 2008 2:56 pm
Mikaila31 Level 4 Member
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Posts: 223
Location: Saint Paul, MN
Have a minor catch them for you then, he can put them in your tank :D.

Post Tue Aug 12, 2008 7:12 pm
Kdogg91 Level 5 Member
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Posts: 309
Location: St. Paul MN
Mikaila31 wrote:
Have a minor catch them for you then, he can put them in your tank :D.


LOL. Thats a good one. I am 16 and have a fishing licsense so I thought the same thing you did and took two sunfish home. They are aggressive fish i must warn you. The one was picking on the other constently. In the end I didn't keep them. You can also buy them from online dealers. Not pumpkin seeds (maybe) but other types. I know there is some sellers on aquabid that sells them regularly.

Post Tue Aug 12, 2008 8:46 pm
Kaluden User avatar
Level 4 Member
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Posts: 184
Location: Shakopee, MN
I have the mentality of a 12 year old, does that count?

I would have issues buying a common Minnesota fish from someone, paying for it, then paying shipping, etc etc.

I kinda figured they might be a bit violent, they could be fun someday though.

Post Tue Aug 19, 2008 12:53 am
pomacanthus User avatar
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Posts: 377
Location: Rogers

Keep in mind natives prefer much cooler water temps than your chiclids. Average year round lake temperature is around 54-58 degrees. Fish metabolize at much higher rates in warmer water and are more prone to protozoan parasites. I keep the fish at the MN Science Museum (natives) and there tank runs 57, fish never get sick, never die - thans with a external drive pump, and a 40W UV Sterilizer. You should consider a chiller for the fishes sake, temps of 74-80 are really hard on native fish whatever species. If your going to run them warm keep in mind that overstocking is a REALLY bad idea because there is less available 02 as the water temp increases and these fish will grow VERY fast in warm temps and you will have to feed them lots and lots and lots of expensive food.

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