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Killie Egg questions

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Post Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:10 pm
fasttalon94 User avatar
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I have been looking around a bit now and so far all of the information about Killifish eggs is how to reactivate them. I would like to know more about deactivating them :-) The species that I am currently getting to lay eggs and hatch in water are the Lamprichthys Tanganicanus from Lake Tanganyika. If I could figure out a way to store the eggs I could give them out to members of the club for others to enjoy as the fry and even the adults are very skittish and sensitive.

My question is this, most people use peat to store/ship the eggs correct? Is this because it has acidic qualities that replicate the fish's natural waters? Or does it have water retention properties and also provides antibacterial agents? Is there a process of drying that needs to happen before the eggs can be stored in peat or does the peat sort of regulate the moisture. (I feel like I'm germinating pepper seeds....which at this time I actually am haha)

From my juvenile group I can usually get about 20 eggs a week out of them. By the time I get to the eggs some are white, some clear, some pink, as they breed all week long but only get a chance to get the eggs during water changes. So far what I have noticed is that the pink ones seem to fair the best, sometimes the clear ones turn pink, and the white ones never make it. So far i have had 3 fry hatch after about 2 weeks in water.

I am having trouble keeping the fungused eggs off of the others. I am storing these eggs in a hang on style breeder box that has been lined with an old net that I cut up so it is fine enough to hold small fry. About 3 times a day I stir up the eggs with a pipette to get any junk that has gotten into the box and on the eggs. I have an egg tumber, should I be using this instead or should I simply place the eggs in some damp peat moss for 2 weeks then return them to the water? Would peat work on this hard water species?

I look forward to hearing more from the local Killi gurus and hopefully raising my success rate with this fish....and get me one step closer to my BAP diversity award!
If you don't put a location in your for sale ad that must mean you're willing to deliver.

Post Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:16 pm
fasttalon94 User avatar
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Oh, 1 more thing...what do you feed your newly hatched Killi? I have golden pearls that I have fed small fry before until I can get them on decapsulated BBS eggs or Artemia. These fry are pretty small!..not as small as those Swellia Lineolata fry but small none the less.
If you don't put a location in your for sale ad that must mean you're willing to deliver.

Post Fri Mar 01, 2013 5:32 pm
nkambae User avatar
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What did you end up going with? I would opt for phyto plankton and infusoria for any tiny fry. Good luck.

stu
Who is John Galt?

Post Sun Mar 03, 2013 8:51 am
fasttalon94 User avatar
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Honestly Stu, I haven't even fed them anything. I think they're just living on the poo that's floating around in the water. I have several that have hatched and a ton that are still eggs.

The most tedious part is picking the dead eggs out of the breeder box. I think I will try some peat moss in a bowl for the rest of these eggs if anything just to keep the fungus down.
If you don't put a location in your for sale ad that must mean you're willing to deliver.

Post Sun Mar 03, 2013 10:14 pm
nkambae User avatar
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I am sure there are a lot of wee things for them to eat in the detritus. A mature tank has LOTS of microscopic life in it.

"My question is this, most people use peat to store/ship the eggs correct? Is this because it has acidic qualities that replicate the fish's natural waters? Or does it have water retention properties and also provides antibacterial agents? Is there a process of drying that needs to happen before the eggs can be stored in peat or does the peat sort of regulate the moisture. (I feel like I'm germinating pepper seeds....which at this time I actually am haha)... "

The answer is all of the above. Many peat spawners are annuals from areas where there is a rainy and a dry season and the dry season can be severe enough to evaporate all the water from the killies' home body of water. The eggs are kept moist in the peat or mud under the dried out crust of lake/pond bottom. There are other non annuals that spawn in peat and can also withstand a short 'dry' period. And, of course, the acidic environment afforded by the peat does have a slight antimicrobial effect as well.

Given the highly alkaline biotope of Lake Tanganyika, I am unsure whether the acidic environment of moist peat would be detrimental, neutral or beneficial to the eggs of Lamprichthys tanganicanus. If the peat doesn't work you can always go to the tried and true acriflavine or methylene blue. Keep us apprised and good luck.

stu
Who is John Galt?

Post Mon Mar 04, 2013 1:19 pm
born ready User avatar
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Unless this fish lives on the margins of the lake and deliberately lays it's eggs where they will dry up as the lake recedes for the dry season then I don't think they would benefit from being dried out. (Of course, you never really let any killie eggs get bone dry anyway.) That's not to say they might not survive being out of water in a damp medium for a few days and the might be a good way to transport them. As Stu said, the peat is great for water retention and the antibacterial qualities can't hurt, but I'd be afraid that it's acid nature might not agree with an egg that's supposed to hatch in Tanganyika. Maybe putting them on a damp, polyester mat, rolling it up and putting that in a baggie would work.

I generally pull my killie eggs and drop them into a shoebox sized plastic container of clean water with some methylene blue added (much of it's benefit is blocking the light) and keep the container out of the bright light. It's easy to pipette out any fungused eggs from that bare box. When they start to hatch, I start diluting the methylene out with more clean water over the course of a few days. Of course, there is almost nothing edible in that setup, so I feed "green water" and microworms until they are big enough for bbs. Microworms are thought to encourage hatching somehow so if you have an issue with eggs that seem good, but never hatch, adding a few worms before any hatching may help bring it on.
Andy

Your tanks aren't too small. Your fish are too big.
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