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Bullhead species

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Post Tue Sep 16, 2014 8:21 pm
Capsaicin User avatar
Level 6 Member
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Posts: 594
Location: Elk River
Hello, my wife is currently going through ideas for her Master's Degree research and she is looking for information on how to identify the 3 types of Bullheads we have here in Minnesota. There is very little information that she can find and anything you can provide will be helpful!
Alex

100g - empty as of November 2014

Post Wed Sep 17, 2014 9:06 am
1-2ride User avatar
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Posts: 789
Location: Lakeville, MN
black, brown and yellow...dont know where best source of info is besides online. MN DNR does have a poster with all fish species in MN. They are free. They are a good source of info as Im sure they study breeding habits and populations.

Post Wed Sep 17, 2014 11:29 pm
Passionfish Level 20 Member
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Posts: 12039
Location: apple valley, mn
Ameirurus nebulosus, A. melas and A. natalis all have scientific diagnosis or descriptions published in scientific literature. In addition keys are typically a portion of these descriptions and are used to key out an unknown bullhead into the species it is.
In addition, DNA analysis is also useful and is likely part of modern diagnosis.

Local DNRs publish images to differentiate A. nebulosus (brown) from A. melas (black) and A. natalis (yellow) bullheads. There are many of these guides published on the web by dozens of DNR from various states.

All of this is useful if a single species is found in a river or lake. When two or all three of the species are introduced to same lake or river, these fish hybridize. There is no description or key to bullhead hybrids. A research project that is well heeled may be able to analysis enough DNA to determine which species crossed and what resulting hybrids are present. If that were a research project, it would be interesting to read the justification for undertaking such a project.
Like a complete unknown

Post Thu Sep 18, 2014 7:23 am
Capsaicin User avatar
Level 6 Member
Level 6 Member

Posts: 594
Location: Elk River
Passionfish wrote:
Ameirurus nebulosus, A. melas and A. natalis all have scientific diagnosis or descriptions published in scientific literature. In addition keys are typically a portion of these descriptions and are used to key out an unknown bullhead into the species it is.
In addition, DNA analysis is also useful and is likely part of modern diagnosis.

Local DNRs publish images to differentiate A. nebulosus (brown) from A. melas (black) and A. natalis (yellow) bullheads. There are many of these guides published on the web by dozens of DNR from various states.

All of this is useful if a single species is found in a river or lake. When two or all three of the species are introduced to same lake or river, these fish hybridize. There is no description or key to bullhead hybrids. A research project that is well heeled may be able to analysis enough DNA to determine which species crossed and what resulting hybrids are present. If that were a research project, it would be interesting to read the justification for undertaking such a project.


The main issue she is looking to research is water quality of lakes based off of what type of Bullhead lives there. The main problem she has right now is being able to distinguish hybrid DNA and find out what combination made the fish. So far she found 1 project that looked at hybrids in the UK and they found about 30 different types of hybrids but through DNA analysis they only found 5 distinct sets with the other 25 having DNA so close they couldn't group them elsewhere.
Alex

100g - empty as of November 2014

Post Thu Sep 18, 2014 7:40 am
Passionfish Level 20 Member
Level 20 Member

Posts: 12039
Location: apple valley, mn
I found one paper about hybrid DNA from Russia I think. But I was not looking specifically for hybrid DNA papers.
Imagine she is well founded in search and will find all there is to find.
Like a complete unknown


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